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You Are What You Eat

We all have up to 100 trillion cells in our bodies, each one demanding a constant supply of daily nutrients in order to function optimally. Food affects all of these cells, and by extension, every aspect of our being: mood, energy levels, food cravings, thinking capacity, sex drive, sleeping habits and general health.

Members: 52
Latest Activity: Aug 8

You Are What You Eat

"Ninety per cent of the diseases known to man are caused by cheap foodstuffs. You are what you eat."

The actual phrase didn't emerge in English until some time later. In the 1920s and 30s, the nutritionist Victor Lindlahr, who was a strong believer in the idea that food controls health, developed the Catabolic Diet. That view gained some adherents at the time and the earliest known printed example is from an advert for beef in a 1923 edition of the Bridgeport Telegraph, for 'United Meet [sic] Markets':

"Ninety per cent of the diseases known to man are caused by cheap foodstuffs. You are what you eat."

In 1942, Lindlahr published You Are What You Eat: how to win and keep health with diet. That seems to be the vehicle that took the phrase into the public consciousness. Lindlahr is likely to have also used the term in his radio talks in the late 1930s (now lost unfortunately), which would also have reached a large audience.

Our Expert Advisors are:

Joannie Dobbs, PhD, CNS is a faculty member of the Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences Department at U.H. Manoa and the clinical nutritionist at the University Health Services medical clinic. Dr. Dobbs obtained her nutrition doctoral degree from the University of California at Davis. Her academic work included an emphasis in dietetics, physiological chemistry, wildlife nutrition, and animal behavior.

C. Alan Titchenal, PhD CNS also is a faculty member of the Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences Department at U.H. Manoa. Dr. Titchenal also obtained a nutrition doctoral degree from the University of California at Davis. His academic focus was related to amino acid nutrition, exercise physiology, and physiological chemistry. 

Discussion Forum

Tryptophan in the diet substantially reduced intestinal inflammation

August 8, 2017Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Protein: A study with mice found that increasing the amino acid tryptophan in the diet substantially reduced intestinal inflammation. This suggests that studies are needed to determine if increased…Continue

Tags: inflammation, intestinal, diet, tryptophan

Started by AquacultureHub Team Aug 8.

Go Mediterranean

Mediterranean-type diets highlight whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and healthy fats from fish, nuts, and healthy oils. This eating style helps promote heart health and may also lessen the risk of memory and thinking problems later in life. In a…Continue

Tags: diets, Mediterranean

Started by AquacultureHub Team May 7.

B12 Deficiency or Alzheimer's Disease

February 25, 2017B12 Deficiency or Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed primarily by observation of progressive impairment of memory and other cognitive functions. Research often links high homocysteine and low vitamin B-12 status…Continue

Tags: Disease, Alzheimer, Deficiency, B12

Started by AquacultureHub Team Feb 25.

Resveratrol Inhalation

Resveratrol Inhalation: Studies of oral supplementation with the phytochemical resveratrol have shown some anti-aging benefits. A new study used inhaled resveratrol in mice with a genetic defect that causes rapid lung aging. They found that…Continue

Tags: Inhalation, Resveratrol

Started by AquacultureHub Team Feb 23.

Free Paper: Does size matter? Observation on the availability of micronutrients in two different sizes of fish

Does size matter? Observation on the availability ofmicronutrients in two different sizes of small freshwaterfish Amblypharyngodon mola (Hamilton, 1822)Sudarshana Nandi and Surjya Kumar SaikiaAbstractTwo size groups (based on Total Length, TL) of…Continue

Tags: freshwater, fish, micronutrients, availability

Started by AquacultureHub Team Jan 20.

Fish: What Pregnant Women and Parents Should Know

The FDA and the EPA are revising their joint fish consumption Advice and Questions & Answers to encourage pregnant women, those who may become pregnant, breastfeeding mothers, and young children to eat more fish and to eat a variety of fish from…Continue

Tags: EPA, FDA

Started by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron Apr 2, 2016.

Milk Protein Component and Gut Health

Milk Protein Component and Gut Health: A component of whey protein called glycomacropeptide (GMP) has been used in diet formulations for the nutritional management of phenylketonuria (PKU) - a genetic condition that requires low dietary levels of…Continue

Tags: glycomacropeptide, phenylketonuria, PKU, Protein, Milk

Started by AquacultureHub Team Aug 25, 2015.

Coffee and Colon Cancer Recovery

Coffee and Colon Cancer Recovery: A study of 953 people recovering from stage III colon cancer found that those who consumed four or more cups of regular coffee per day had significantly less recurrence of their cancer. Tea and decaffeinated coffee…Continue

Tags: Recovery, Cancer, Colon, Coffee

Started by AquacultureHub Team Aug 20, 2015.

Could a vitamin or mineral deficiency be behind your fatigue? 2 Replies

The world moves at a hectic pace these days. If you feel like you're constantly running on empty, you're not alone. Many people say that they just don't have the energy they need to accomplish all they need to. Sometimes the cause of fatigue is…Continue

Tags: eggs, dietary, oral, rice, beans

Started by AquacultureHub Team. Last reply by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron Aug 5, 2015.

Prozac In The Yogurt Aisle: Can 'Good' Bacteria Chill Us Out?

Prozac In The Yogurt Aisle: Can 'Good' Bacteria Chill Us Out? http://t.co/OqrNGjpI7B

Tags: Bacteria, Yogurt, Prozac

Started by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron Jul 14, 2015.

Comment Wall

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You need to be a member of You Are What You Eat to add comments!

Comment by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron on June 16, 2017 at 9:37am
This Week in Health: How Farmers Turn Salmon Pink - TIME
https://apple.news/AUWnOLX42ToS1B13F6b8Ktw

Shared from Apple News
Comment by AquacultureHub Team on May 12, 2017 at 11:58pm

Stress and Intestinal Function: In response to four days of intensive military training that was both physically and psychologically demanding and stressful, soldiers experienced an increase in intestinal permeability, inflammation, and a change in the relative amounts of various bacteria in their lower intestine. These changes also may occur in athletes during periods of intensive training and would be expected to increase the risk for a number of problems, including increased susceptibility to illness and infection, and, if chronic, increased disease risk.

Consumer Related Article:
Prolonged military-style training causes changes to intestinal bact... 
Research Related Article:
Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2017 Mar 23. [Epub ahead o...

TO LEARN MORE ON THIS TOPIC
www.manoa.hawaii.edu/gotnutrients

Comment by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron on May 10, 2017 at 5:38pm

This Infographic Shows How Only 10 Companies Own All The World’s Brands - to read more click HERE

Comment by Vinny Mendoza on March 5, 2015 at 1:56am

This is a great selling point for local farmers!

Comment by C. Alan Titchenal on March 3, 2015 at 10:36am

Change in dietary cholesterol concern - this article is about some of the recent changes in "Dietary Guidelines for Americans." 

Comment by Sahib Punjabi on March 3, 2015 at 3:51am

Comment by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron on March 3, 2015 at 3:38am

The Government's Bad Diet Advice http://nyti.ms/19KIJUM

Comment by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron on February 26, 2015 at 7:09am

Consumer Trends: What are we eating? Read More HERE

Comment by Roy Palmer on February 9, 2013 at 9:13am

The Global Initiative for Life & Leadership through Seafood (GILLS) was established after the International Seafood & Health Conference in Melbourne in Nov 2010. See www.gillseafood.com.

 Keen to get Universities and Gvts engaged in this. We have a session at Nashville on Monday 25 Feb 2012

Comment by Kaui Lucas on March 30, 2012 at 11:44am

They found that the tarballs -- which oil executives and government officials have said are little more than a nuisance -- are teeming with bacteria, including Vibrio vulnificus, the leading cause of death from eating bad oysters.

Auburn researcher finds dangerous bacteria in tar balls from Gulf o...

 

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