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Coral Aquaculture

Coral aquaculture is an alternative to coral reef harvests and reef restoration. Many coral reefs worldwide are rapidly declining, but efficient restoration techniques were not yet available..... until

Members: 64
Latest Activity: Sep 12

Coral restoration is studied by Buki and Sahi. Check below Dudi Gada's video.

Discussion Forum

Information on Two Coral Documents for Public Review

As part of NOAA's ongoing process to evaluate 82 species of coral…Continue

Tags: Documents, Coral, Endangered, Caribbean, Pacific

Started by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron Apr 14, 2012.

The trade in corals and coral reef organisms causing the removal of 30 million fish and 1.5 million live stony corals a year 2 Replies

Using data from the United Nation's conservation monitoring program, scientists say that the trade in corals and coral reef organisms is growing significantly causing the removal of 30 million fish and 1.5 million live stony corals a year. So it is…Continue

Tags: wildlife, ecology, trade, impact, reef

Started by AquacultureHub Team. Last reply by Aviad B.Z. Dec 21, 2010.

The Coral Triangle 2 Replies

CLIMATE CHANGE:  ECOSYSTEMS, PEOPLE AND SOCIETIES AT RISKThe Coral Triangle is defined by marine zones  containing at least 500 species of reef-building  coral. The Coral Triangle supports livelihoods and provides income and food…Continue

Tags: triangle, resources, reef, restoration, risk

Started by AquacultureHub Team. Last reply by Aviad B.Z. Dec 20, 2010.

Saving the Oceans, One Island at a Time!

I found this video on ted.com, a wonderful website with many great videos about ideas that are evolving and being shared about all different subjects. I was watching this one about the Phoenix Islands and the Country of Kiribati and the Protected…Continue

Tags: climate, rising oceans, Pacific, fishing, Global Warming

Started by Sean Robinson Nov 27, 2010.

A basic brooding coral resource for hobbyists and researchers alike.

ALCON, There is hope in sexual propagation of corals to say the least, in fact there have been many efforts both large scale and small scale in the last few years. I'd like to point any interested party to a quiet but active group that has been…Continue

Started by Joe Thompson Oct 12, 2010.

National Marine Fisheries Service to review threats for 82 coral species 3 Replies

In response to a petition dated 20 October, the National Marine Fisheries Service announced in the Federal Register on Wednesday that 82 more species beyond the two (Acropora palmata, A. cervicornis) which currently have threatened status under the…Continue

Started by Dave Takaki. Last reply by Dave Takaki Feb 14, 2010.

The Black Hole, or 'I know you're out there, and interested in corals 1 Reply

It's Saturday morning, and before I go up to Mom's I thought I'd post some stuff others may not have seen (some is old) in the interests of generating grist for discussion and nudging corals culture forward.  Corals are sessile. We're not.  Let's…Continue

Started by Dave Takaki. Last reply by Dave Takaki Feb 13, 2010.

Impact of Ocean Acidification on Hawaiian Coral Reefs in the 21st Century 2 Replies

Presentation by Paul Jokiel during Hawaii Conservation Conference 2009 - Climate ChangeLevels of ocean acidification at twice present day pCO2 will occur during this century unless extreme measures are taken to reduce fossil fuel combustion. The…Continue

Tags: ocean, calcification, environmental, fossil, marine

Started by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron. Last reply by Dave Takaki Feb 11, 2010.

LA Reefs takes steps to reduce demand on the export of wild live corals and invertebrates.

LA Reefs takes steps to reduce demand on the export of wild live corals and invertebrates.A large scale propagation system is being constructed in Los Angeles to breed Anemones.…Continue

Tags: ocean, calcification, environmental, fossil, marine

Started by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron Nov 16, 2009.

Comment Wall

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Comment by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron on June 21, 2017 at 8:46am
Gulf of Eilat corals probed for secret to surviving global warming http://toi.sr/2tMagiR via @timesofisrael
Comment by Dr. Tetsuzan Benny Ron on April 27, 2015 at 9:24am
@TerraMarProject: Study reveals #climatechange isn't the biggest threat to #corals, human activity is: http://t.co/8fGfblkTWx #reef http://t.co/qcTtHovDaS
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 6, 2009 at 9:57pm
Attached is an Extract of Corals information from a report on the Ornamental Aquarium tradeCorals Extract - From Ocean to Aquarium.pdf
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 5, 2009 at 3:44pm
The issue can be distilled to a high degree of proof of origin and the ability to check quickly. The problem is that while one may be able to visually prove that a hard coral colony recruited to a identifiable substrate, things get cloudier when one also engages in propagation (breaking starters off of a parent colony and fixing to a substrate).

Ultimately, the only system that would really work is a licensing regime where permits are given grudgingly and the penalty for infractions is severe, immediate and permanent canceling of the permit and a fine. This could possibly be coupled with standardized, marked substrate, and rigorous recordkeeping.

Of course, if the above is timed and coupled with incipient propagation in federal waters, the incentive for DLNR to bend in order to maintain some regulatory control becomes a factor. So perhaps timing is the operative delta factor. Then terrestrial operations could become a reality.

One crooked operator could kill the whole thing...
Comment by Stephen Van Kampen-Lewis on October 5, 2009 at 12:17pm
Dave,
You are right about the official I talked to and you have really interesting ideas about an offshore coral culture area being a part of a larger mariculture operation. But do you think there is any way to alleviate the concerns of DLNR about enforcement of legit growers vs. illegal harvesters being impossible? If that problem were solved, then I think there could be a possibility of a coral industry in Hawaii.
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 5, 2009 at 7:32am
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 5, 2009 at 7:31am
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 5, 2009 at 7:30am
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 5, 2009 at 7:30am
Comment by Dave Takaki on October 5, 2009 at 7:29am
Ironic

I understand David Gulko's concerns, but it is ironic that we do corals research at HIMB among other facilities, and Waikiki Aquarium is in many ways the epicenter of corals husbandry and propagation. Many aquarium operations, in both the public and private sectors have benefited from their experience.

Here is a scattering of papers that could point to offshore growout:

An Ancient Chemosensory Mechanism Brings New Life to Coral Reefs

Marine Chemical Ecology

Coral recruitment and early benthic community development on several materials used in the construction of artificial reefs and breakwaters

Substratum preferences in planula larvae of two species of scleractinian corals

AN ANCIENT CHEMICAL CUE THAT COULD HELP SAVE CORAL REEFS


Substratum preferences in planula larvae.pdf
 

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